Whyte G150£2,499.99

Do-it-all trail machine

BikeRadar score3/5

Whyte are another bike company to embrace both the popularity of enduro racing and what seems like the meteoric rise of the 650B wheel. This has culminated in their new G150 bikes.

The Gravity Enduro range consists of two bikes - the more expensive G150 Works and the G150, which is the bike reviewed here.

Frame and equipment: do-it-all geometry

The G150 frame is specifically designed around 650B wheels, and boasts the sort of geometry that should let you tackle anything you come across on the trail or at an enduro-type race. Admittedly the G150 does appear a little industrial, but look past the aesthetics and Whyte have done a decent job with the numbers.

The generous 610mm top tube (medium frame size), 67-degree head angle and 430mm chainstays certainly look spot on for the bike's intended use. The QUAD-4 suspension system has been tweaked and now features a shock shuttle that attaches directly to the base of the RockShox Monarch RT3, which controls the 150mm (5.9in) of rear wheel travel. 

We were pleased to see is the inclusion of stealth dropper post routing, which really helps clean up the overall look and reduce annoying leg slapping cable clutter.

The highlight on the standard G150 is the RockShox Pike RC fork, which features 150mm (5.9in) of supple, supportive travel. The Avid Elixir Trail brakes offer plenty of power and control in just about every situation we've tried them in. The 50mm stem and 750mm wide bar give plenty of control and leverage and complement the longer top tube perfectly.

Ride and handling: stable and confident

Jump aboard the G150 and the first thing you'll notice is the lengthy top tube which, when paired with the 50mm stem, gives enough stretch on the climbs while ensuring maximum steering reactivity. These dimensions, combined with the 650B wheels, make for a stable, confident ride at speed. In the air, it's a similar story - the G150's unwavering stability is reassuring in tricky situations.

Thanks in part to the 430mm chainstays, the bike is still lively and flickable enough on the trail, which boosts the fun factor. Although it weighs just over 31lb, the Whyte still feels reasonably sprightly.

The suspension offers enough support to let you push the bike hard on fast undulating trails and really work the terrain. Drop in and power out of tight turns and you'll notice some flex in the rear end, which is a combination of rear wheel and rear triangle flexing. This does knock cornering prowess and accuracy, especially when you're trying to pick up the pace in more technical terrain and may put some more aggressive riders off.

This article was originally published in Mountain Biking UK magazine, available on Apple Newsstand and Zinio.

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