Power2Max FSA Gossamer power meter review£785.00

Spider-based power meter

BikeRadar score4/5

German company Power2Max has been in the business a few years with its versatile and inexpensive spider-based power meter. The first version didn’t handle temperature changes well at all, but that problem has been solved by the addition of a Wheatstone bridge (a circuit that enables accurate measurement of unknown electrical resistance) into the unit.

    That dramatically improved the quality of data, and the meter we used in this test was always within 0-1 watts (average power over 50 mins) of our reliable/proven to be accurate control, the two tracking very closely to each other throughout each ride.

    We tested taking it from a warm room to the cold air outside and riding straight away, as well as allowing it to equilibrate for several hours at riding temperature. This had no discernible effect on comparisons with other meters’ data.

    The Power2Max benefits from being user serviceable in terms of battery replacement, easy to pair and zero with an ANT+ head unit, and relatively easy to swap between bikes. It’s available in crank lengths from 165 to 175mm (other models have a bigger range) with all major bottom bracket types catered for. Our unit came with a full crankset and rings; Power2Max also sells the spider alone.

    We would have liked longer on it to test durability but based on our ‘ride through a puddle’ test we can confirm that it is sufficiently waterproof to handle wet winters.

    What’s not to like? Not much really. It’s not particularly aero and is heavy at 988g, including a set of Praxis Works chainrings, but it’s a well-priced, good quality unit, and we like it a lot.

    Note: at the time of publication, Power2Max has improved the aerodynamics of its Power2Max Type-S, which is currently being used by the Movistar team.

    While the Power2Max FSA Gossamer isn't available in Australia, BikeRadar Australia readers should note that it can be ordered from New Zealand site bikecycle.co.nz.

    This article was originally published in Cycling Plus magazine, available on Apple Newsstand and Zinio.

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