Green Guru recycles one million pounds into new cycling gear

Colorado company hits landmark reusing tubes, tarps and other materials

Some people throw out their inner tubes when punctured, or trash nylon when old or out of fashion. Green Guru, on the other hand, has made a business of recycling these materials into backpacks, saddle bags and other cycling products. This year, the Colorado company hit a milestone of a million pounds (453,592kg) of repurposing raw materials.

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Green Guru opened shop in 2005 in Boulder, Colorado, and gets its raw materials from places like local bike and outdoors shops. The outdoor collective REI donates used bike tubes that are used in most Green Guru products. For its insulating and productive products like beer Koozies and laptop sleeves, Green Guru sources used wetsuits from Sea World and Patagonia.

Last year after Interbike, Green Guru took the used signage from the exhibition hall and remade it into packs
Last year after Interbike, Green Guru took the used signage from the exhibition hall and remade it into packs
Ben Delaney / Immediate Media

Because of its business model, Green Guru has a gold level status with the Colorado Environmental Leadership Program.

Last year, Green Guru’s parent company Eco Brand Groups purchased Alchemy Goods, another environmentally friendly ‘upcycler’ of cycling products.

Green Guru recently purchased Alchemy Goods, another upcycle brand that makes stuff like this wallet
Green Guru recently purchased Alchemy Goods, another upcycle brand that makes stuff like this wallet
Ben Delaney / Immediate Media

Less waste into landfills and more cool bike products into the world? Green Guru calls that a win win, at a million pounds and counting.

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You can check out Green Guru’s gear on its website.

Need to transport a bunch of beer on your bike? Green Guru has fork sleeves and an insulated six-pack holder that drapes over a top tube
Need to transport a bunch of beer on your bike? Green Guru has fork sleeves and an insulated six-pack holder that drapes over a top tube
Ben Delaney / Immediate Media