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Osprey Raptor 10 hydration pack review

A slim ergonomic pack with well-considered storage

Our rating 
4.0 out of 5 star rating 4.0
GBP £110.00 RRP | USD $140.00
Osprey Raptor 10 hydration pack for mountain bikers

Our review

Osprey’s Raptor 10 is a compact pack that's still large enough to carry all the water and essentials you need for a big day out
Pros: Good sized storage for most rides; well-distributed weight; super comfy; built-in tool roll is a nice touch
Cons: Drinking hose routed across the chest; no external straps to carry a full-face helmet
Skip to view product specifications

In Osprey’s extensive line of hydration backpacks, the Raptor is pitched as a ‘premium hydration pack’ and designed for carrying ride essentials rather than big cargo, to help you ride faster and further.

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The Raptor is available in 10- and 14-litre versions and I’ve got the smaller of the two here, which has a long, slim shape that widens at the bottom to keep weight low and evenly distributed across your back.

Heavy items such as tools can be stored down in the dedicated tool-roll pocket, and there are two compression straps for pulling everything tight.

The Raptor’s main compartment extends the length of the bag, zipping fully open for easy access and has long organiser pouches well suited to ride essentials, such as pumps.

On the outside are two small eyewear/ valuables pockets plus an extra expandable pouch and Osprey’s ‘LidLock’ tab for carrying a helmet. This work by slotting your helmet through one of the vents and securing with the elasticated rubber tab, and it worked well with every helmet I tried. There are no straps or capacity to carry a full-face helmet, though.

Osprey’s 2.5l Hydraulics LT reservoir is contained in a separate compartment, which zips open onto the shoulder strap, making the bladder easy to remove. The design is essentially a re-branded Hydrapak system and that’s no bad thing because I’ve always found these to be durable, simple to fill/clean, and the twist-to-close bite valves ergonomic.

My only complaint is that the drinking tube is on the right but the magnetic clip for the bite valve is on the left side of the chest strap, so you have a loop of hose across your chest, which is prone to getting knocked loose.

Fit and comfort are good though; the pack conforms well to the body, the shoulder straps have a thin profile but are wide and ventilated, the zipped hip pockets are a decent size and the compression straps do a good job of pulling in the load and keeping the pack in place no matter what the terrain. There’s a women’s-specific Raven model, too.

The Airspace back panel consists of two foam pads split by a central cut-out, so ventilation is pretty good. The generous waist belt, as well as having zipped stash pockets, really helps to stabilise the load, too.

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Osprey Raptor 10 hydration pack bottom line

The Raptor 10 has a mid-range price that’s accompanied by Osprey’s excellent construction quality and includes a drinking reservoir, which many don’t. It’s really only the way the drinking hose is secured that lets this pack down.

How we tested

If you’re headed out on a long ride away from civilisation you’ll need a good hydration pack that will allow you to carry more, drink more and be better prepared.

We tested a selection of packs ranging from 8 litres to 15 litres, which we reckon is the ideal size range for a one-day ride, and priced from £40 to £140.

As well as store all of your stuff, a hydration pack also needs to be comfortable and secure, and we put them to the test on multiple rides, ranging from quick blasts in local woods to big all-day outings.

Also on test

Product Specifications

Product

Price GBP £110.00USD $140.00
Weight 903g

Features

Bag capacity 10l
Bladder capacity 2.5l