Syncros Duncan Dropper 2.0

Do the remarkable similarities with other top performing posts hint at the Syncro’s performance?

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Our rating 
4.0 out of 5 star rating 4.0
GBP £210.00 RRP | USD $230.00
Syncros Duncan Dropper 2.0 seatpost

Our review

Although available size and travel options could limit whether you can run this post, if you can it’s a great performer for a reasonable price
Pros: Excellent smooth action; pressure adjustable; reliable twin bolt saddle clamp
Cons: Restricted sizes available; over bar remote as standard would be improved with shifter-style; fiddly fitting procedure
Skip to view product specifications

Syncros’s Duncan Dropper 2.0 is a cable operated, internally routed seatpost with vertical-push remote operation and is available in 125 and 150mm travel options.

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Unfortunately, due to the limited travel options and only one diameter (31.6mm) available, unlike something such as the RockShox Reverb with its vast array of travel options and post diameters, this is likely to preclude most riders from joining the Syncros Duncan 2.0 party, which is a shame. I can only assume it is a result of Syncros’s close relationship with Scott bikes and its specific requirements.

Despite this, the Duncan Dropper 2.0 is a very functional post at a competitive price.

I did have to wrestle with the awkward cabling style that required the barrel to be grub screwed at the post end, which was a bit of a pain as I much prefer the cable nipple at the post end for a much slicker fitting operation.

Mine came with the over-bar remote and a noodle to guide the cable around the brake levers and/or gear shifters, which is handy if you are trucking a 2x or 3x setup with left-hand shifter in evidence.

Given the choice, I would always opt for the below-bar shifter-style remote, where you are running 1x without a left-hand shifter, but this particular one proved to be one of the better vertical-push models, giving a nicely weighted action without the usual vague feel and sideways lever flex of some.

If you didn’t get on with the remote you could always replace it with another manufacturer of course, but do make sure the next one has the same cabling style, taking the cable nipple at the lever.

The action was excellent, however, smooth and consistent straight out the box, so I didn’t feel the need to pop the saddle and adjust the pressure of the Schraeder valve at the top of the mast, unlike many posts where the cartridge is sealed, even though that was an option.

It means you could fine-tune the return speed or replace air if you felt it was leaking, too, so it isn’t a bad feature.

Syncros Duncan Dropper 2.0 seatpost remote
My Duncan Dropper came with the over-bar lever with noodle to guide the cable around the brake lever area.
Andy McCandlish

The smooth black finish has been robust and I’m yet to make a mark on it even a month or two down the line, so durability is looking good.

I’m always a fan of the reliable two-bolt seat clamp that rarely goes wrong, too, and it allows for plenty of adjustment to level up the saddle.

I did notice a lot of the hardware looked similar to the Race Face and Brand-X posts also on test, with only details such as the cable attachment mode, adjustable pressure and remote differentiating them.

This branding of off-the-shelf posts is fine because these particular ones all seem to be of a very decent quality, but it does mean it’s worth keeping your eyes peeled for bargains.

The Brand-X is likely the same quality post (shamelessly it even comes in the same box, albeit a different colour) and it’s £60 cheaper, with an improved remote and cabling style, so think hard how tied you are to specific brands before dropping your cash.

Of course, those of us that hail from the nineties dreamily remember Syncros as a premium brand, so that alone might be enough to encourage uptake of this excellent post, regardless of price penalty.

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On the upside, you will get a durable and reliable workhorse that should go on and on. Just replace that remote sharpish if you are running a 1x setup.

How we tested

A selection of the latest seatposts were tested head to head to find out which ones rise to the top or fall by the wayside.

Other posts on test:

  • Syncros Duncan Dropper 2.0
  • RockShox Reverb Stealth C1 with 1x remote
  • Brand-X Ascend II
  • Magura Vyron eLect
  • Crankbrothers Highline 7
  • KS Lev Integra
  • Race Face Aeffect-R

Dropper post jargon

Cartridge

On most droppers, the spring and damper, as well as the release valve, are held in a sealed unit called a cartridge. Most posts are air-sprung, and have a valve to adjust their return rate.

‘Infinite’ adjustment

When the post can be locked in place at any point in their travel it is known as ‘infinite’ adjustment. You can also buy posts with predetermined lock positions.

Layback

Term for a saddle clamp that’s positioned behind the line of the seatpost. This places the rider further from the bar and behind the bottom bracket. An ‘inline’ post has no layback.

Remote

Small lever/button on the bar that actuates the post mechanism, via a cable, hydraulic hose or wireless connection. Can be positioned under or over the bar, depending on your preference/set-up.

Return rate

The speed at which the post returns to its fully-extended position. On most droppers this can be adjusted by using a shock pump to vary the air-spring preload pressure.

Stack height

Length from the bottom of the post’s collar to the centre of the saddle rails. The smaller the better for a given amount of travel because it leaves more room to squeeze in a longer-drop post.

Product Specifications

Product

Price GBP £210.00USD $230.00
Weight 562g (150mm) – without remote/cable
Brand Syncros

Features

Features Available sizes: 125, 150mm
Length 458mm
Material Aluminium
Travel 150mm