B'Twin is dead, long live B'Twin

New branding and new bikes for everyone

French sports behemoth Decathlon has been making bikes under the B’Twin name for years, establishing the brand as a go-to for value for money. Over the coming year or so the B’Twin name will be consigned to kids’ bikes only, as part of a branding shake-up that will see numerous new bikes launched, targeting a huge range of riders including both road and mountain bikers.

Every kind of road bike for every kind of rider

Unlike most bike brands who love nothing more than a ruthlessly enforced embargo, Decathlon was quite open about its long-term plans.

At the entry level of the road range, Triban will become the brand rather than just a model, with new bikes called the Adept and Adept Plus taking over from the old B’Twin Triban bikes in the sub-£1,000 category.

The Triban Adept is expected to cost under £600. This is a pre-production model so some details may yet be tidied up, but the specs won't be changing radically
The Triban Adept is expected to cost under £600. This is a pre-production model so some details may yet be tidied up, but the specs won't be changing radically

The new machines will have discs and a new frame with a-la-mode dropped seatstays. The old rim-brake Triban will continue for the time being as an online-only model, but the likelihood is that it will be phased out in time.

The Adept+ will sell for around £749 with 105 shifting and TRP Hy/Rd semi-hydraulic discs
The Adept+ will sell for around £749 with 105 shifting and TRP Hy/Rd semi-hydraulic discs

Decathlon’s higher-end race and endurance road bikes will be sold under a new, yet-to-be-revealed moniker.

The latest version of the Ultra 920 AF alloy racer costs a bit more, but offers a very appealing spec
The latest version of the Ultra 920 AF alloy racer costs a bit more, but offers a very appealing spec

The Ultra AF racer has been given some small but important tweaks, which I covered in my first ride review

Alongside this, a more endurance-focussed machine called the Ultra AF GF offers generous tyre clearances, disc brakes, and thru-axles.

The Ultra AF GF is an all-new model with discs, thru-axles and bigger clearances
The Ultra AF GF is an all-new model with discs, thru-axles and bigger clearances

A Tiagra-equipped model with mechanical calipers will retail at £899, while a version with full SRAM Rival hydraulics and Ksyrium Disc wheels will come in at £1,299. There’ll even be a 1× option in the near future.

The AF GF eschews cable ties — all hoses are bolted in place
The AF GF eschews cable ties — all hoses are bolted in place

The top-end Ultra CF has received similar updates to the alloy model, and the latest spec for the flagship model is pretty incredible.

The range-topping Ultra 940 CF has a huge spec for the money
The range-topping Ultra 940 CF has a huge spec for the money

For £3,499 / €3,800 you get a full carbon frameset kitted out with full mechanical Dura-Ace, Zipp 303s with Vittoria Corsa G+ graphene tyres, and full carbon finishing kit including a carbon-railed Fizik Antares saddle.

Zipps, direct mount Dura-Ace brakes and Vittoria graphene tyres — there's a lot to like here!
Zipps, direct mount Dura-Ace brakes and Vittoria graphene tyres — there's a lot to like here!

Women’s specific, sort of

The Ultra AF Enduracer Woman takes the standard Ultra AF frame and adds women's specific parts, as chosen by an all-female team of designers
The Ultra AF Enduracer Woman takes the standard Ultra AF frame and adds women's specific parts, as chosen by an all-female team of designers

While you’d probably describe most of Decathlon’s bikes as unisex, the company now has an all-female team dedicated solely to women’s specific bikes.

Its first model is the Ultra AF Enduracer Woman, which takes the standard Ultra AF frameset and dresses it in components deemed more appropriate for female cyclists: a different saddle, shorter stem, narrower bars, a compact with shorter crank arms, and softer bar tape (yes, really). The reach on the brake levers will be adjusted inwards for smaller hands by default.

One of these is soft-touch bar tape, apparently
One of these is soft-touch bar tape, apparently

The women’s bike will be sold in sizes XS to M covering rider heights of approximately 150–175cm, and comes in its own colour scheme that manages (I think) to be subtly distinct from the unisex bike, but not too stereotypically feminine.

It’s built with Tiagra shifting kit and Tektro brakes (there’s no direct mount Shimano option at this level, and the fork requires it), plus B’Twin’s own wheels.

I rather like these subtle highlights inside the fork legs
I rather like these subtle highlights inside the fork legs

This spec weighs a claimed 9.2kg (size small) and costs €900.

Adventure-ho — Vista?

Decathlon isn’t stopping there with its road range. It’s some way off (2020 perhaps), but a new range of more adventure-oriented bikes is in development under the name Vista. (Vista is a category rather than a brand — I'm not sure what it'll say on the down tube yet...)

These will be aimed at experienced riders who like to put in serious miles on varied terrain and surfaces, and while we have only the scantest of details, it sounds like Decathlon will be going after the gravel and bikepacking market.

What about mountain bikes?

The B’Twin name will be disappearing from the trails too, with Rockrider (an existing model range) taking over.

B’Twin’s current MTB offering is, with the best will in the world, extremely Euro. That’s set to change next year when a new range of UK-oriented trail bikes will hit the shops, promising more progressive geometry that’s in line with current trends. (I wonder where that idea came from?)

We haven’t laid eyes on one of the new Rockriders yet but given how aggressively Decathlon prices its bikes, this can only be good news for riders.

Do you like what you see from Decathlon? Click through the gallery above for lots more photos of the new bikes.

Matthew Allen

Senior Technical Writer, UK
Former bike mechanic, builder of wheels, hub fetishist and lover of shiny things. Likes climbing a lot, but not as good at it as he looks.
  • Discipline: Road, with occasional MTB dalliances
  • Preferred Terrain: Long mountain climbs followed by high-speed descents (that he doesn't get to do nearly often enough), plus scaring himself off-road when he outruns his skill set.
  • Current Bikes: Scott Addict R3 2014, Focus Cayo Disc 2015, Niner RLT 9
  • Dream Bike: Something hideously expensive and custom with external cables and a threaded bottom bracket because screw you bike industry.
  • Beer of Choice: Cider, please. Thistly Cross from Scotland
  • Location: Bristol, UK

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