Indoor only kit, a smartwatch to tell you all and a stem to, er, tell you something?

First Look Friday: Your weekly roundup of the most desirable kit to land at BikeRadar HQ

  The products mentioned in this article are selected and reviewed independently by our journalists. When you buy through links on our site we may earn an affiliate commission, but this never influences our opinion.
First Look Friday thumbnail

What another busy week we’ve had here on BikeRadar, from a multitude of reviews including an AXS Reverb dropper, an Elite Drivo II smart trainer and plenty of lights to keep your riding this winter, to all the news you need to know in cycling – check out our Latest News tab!

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We’ve also had our latest BikeRadar Podcast go live, where we discuss the future of road cycling. Don’t forget to subscribe…

But that’s not why you’re here, you want to see NEW STUFF! So, here we go… First Look Friday is go.

Madison Turbo men’s short sleeve jersey

Madison turbo jersey
This really is an indoor specific jersey
Tom Marvin / Immediate Media

As you’ll have heard in the above podcast, the future is indoor cycling, and if you’re bolting your bike into one of the many turbo trainers out there you’ll need the appropriate attire. God forbid your e-cycling friends catch you riding in anything else!

Madison turbo jersey zip
Super-thin material should mean minimum warmth.
Tom Marvin / Immediate Media

Madison’s kit isn’t necessarily quite as daft as it seems, especially if you’re current kit is UK centric and designed for cycling in temperate climes.

The extra thin, super-breathable material should help you cope with sweatier, somewhat less windy indoor conditions, so you aren’t dripping quite as much sweat over your cream deep-pile carpets.

The material’s fibres have an anti-bacterial treatment, reducing the anti-socialness of your chosen form of cycling, and there’s no print on the material, meaning it can be washed at 60 degrees to kill any remaining pong-producing bacteria.

Madison turbo jersey detail
Going nowhere fast.
Tom Marvin / Immediate Media

Final details include a full-length zip to let the smallest hint of house-bound moving air grace your chest, while there’s an elasticated hem to keep the jersey in place. There are no pockets here, but we suspect you could just put your spare tube on the table next to you.

Garmin Vivoactive 4s

Garmin Vivoactive 4s
Home screen of the Garmin Vivoactive 4s.
Simon Bromley / Immediate Media

The Vivoactive 4s is Garmin’s latest smartwatch with plenty of GPS (and thus cycling) functionality for those who don’t want the expense or potential complexity (though massive functionality) of the latest range of Fenix 6 watches.

The ‘s’ stands for small (we think), and there’s an identically functioning Vivoactive 4 for those with chunkier wrists.

Garmin Vivoactive 4s
The stock cycling tracking screen, which is customisable.
Simon Bromley / Immediate Media

There are a number of upgrades over the Vivoactive 3, most noticeably the inclusion of an extra button on the side, to make navigating the watch’s functions that little bit easier.

The watch, as you’d imagine, has an optical heart rate monitor, connects to all the usual GPS satellites and has a swift-functioning colour touchscreen.

The ride tracking capabilities mean easy documentation of your ride, as well as a plethora of detail, via Garmin Connect and Strava. In addition to cycling, the watch can track a range of other sports and can even show you how to do pilates and yoga via mini animations on the screen. Incredible.

Garmin Vivoactive 4s
Mini animations tell you how to do pilates!
Simon Bromley / Immediate Media

Smart features include music controls, Garmin Pay, health tracking and plenty of notifications, so you won’t constantly be searching for your phone every time it buzzes.

Garmin Vivoactive 4s
Plenty of health tracking data on the Vivoactive.
Simon Bromley / Immediate Media

Oh, and it’ll tell you the time too. Look out for a review soon.

Speednite Smart Stem

Speednite stem
This bulky stem has hidden tricks.
Simon Bromley / Immediate Media

A rather unique product landed in our hands this week, a smart stem!

Though bulky in nature, the stem packs in a multitude of functionalities. At the front is a small screen, which, when paired with your phone, its app and HR strap, can show various data.

The stem extends past the bar clamp to a front headlight, and this is where things get really interesting.

Speednite stem
Speednite include a screen on the stem to show you ride data.
Simon Bromley / Immediate Media

Attached to your helmet should be a small sensor. This sensor (along with a supplementary remote control) can automatically move the beam of the headlight side to side, up and down, depending on where the sensor thinks you’re looking or if you use the remote to tell it.

Furthermore, the sensor can also activate laser beam indicators, also mounted on the stem and in the associated rear light, to let drivers know where you’re planning to go, simply by rotating your head in that direction.

Speednite stem
The front light points where you’re looking.
Simon Bromley / Immediate Media

Safety is further enhanced by a couple of extra features. Should you brake heavily – and the sensitivity can be adjusted – the rear light will flash its indicator lights to act as a brake light.

In a crash, or if you press the appropriate button on your controller, the tail and indicator lights will all flash as a hazard warning light.

Finally, if you do crash, the app can alert an emergency contact – much in the same way Specialized’s Angi system does. You can find out even more about this stem in our news story about the Speednite stem.!

Speednite stem
The additional units: rear light, remote control, helmet sensor.
Simon Bromley / Immediate Media
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