11spd: This week’s best new bike gear

New kit from Park Tool, Giro, Fabric and more

Like the renegade master we are back once again, although our ill behaviour is limited to photographing and describing eleven of the hottest happenings in bikes right now. It’s been a busy week too, with our writers out testing Shimano’s latest Dura-Ace 9170 Di2 group, rummaging through the shiny stuff at the Tour Down Under and giving you the low down on Garmin’s popular Edge 820 computer.

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New mountain bike gear

Park Tool GG-1 grease gun

Park's GG-1 grease gun now takes pride of place in BikeRadar's workshop
Park’s GG-1 grease gun now takes pride of place in BikeRadar’s workshop
Oliver Woodman / Immediate Media

Most things sound a lot better in French, the word grease gun being a prime example. Going with that, this pistolet à graisse is the same part that you’ll find in many bike shops, but it’s ideal for the keen home mechanic too.

Grease can either be delivered through the included canister (though there’s no grease inside) or directly from a compatible grease/anti-seize or assembly compound tube. A spring-loaded plunger that sits in your palm can then accurately control its flow.

We’ve handed it over to our workshop manager Jonny Ashelford, who will subject it to frequent use along with exposure to heavy metal music.

  • £19.99 / $19.99 / AU$TBC

Giro Cartelle MIPS

Giro's Cartelle helmet
Giro’s Cartelle helmet
Oliver Woodman / Immediate Media

The Cartelle is essentially the women’s version of Giro’s Chronicle trail helmet. Sitting below the brand’s more spendy Montara, the Cartelle packs much of the same technology at a far friendlier price.

At the rear, a height adjustable cradle houses a retention dial. The straps, liner and buckles co-ordinate perfectly with the lid’s colour scheme too – and if this teal/turquoise doesn’t work for you then you’ll be pleased to know there are three other colour options.

The straps, buckle and padding are nicely colour-coordinated
The straps, buckle and padding are nicely colour-coordinated
Oliver Woodman / Immediate Media

The in-mold shell with its 13 vents also features an adjustable visor and has been designed to play nicely with goggles. Inside there’s MIPS technology as standard, which allows your head to twist slightly in an accident, lessening the extent of serious injury in some circumstances.

The MIPS liner does make things noticeably smaller though, so if you normally sit between sizes in Giro helmets then we’d suggest sizing up. Our medium test lid weighs 351g.

  • £99.95 / $99.95 / AU$169.99

BikeYoke Revive dropper seatpost

BikeYoke's Revive dropper can be bled quickly and simply using just a 4mm Allen key
BikeYoke’s Revive dropper can be bled quickly and simply using just a 4mm Allen key
Oliver Woodman / Immediate Media

We’ve spoken about the Revive dropper post from BikeYoke a couple of times already here at BikeRadar. You may remember it for its unique design that goes without an IFP (internal floating piston), something that its creators said made it “basically maintenance free”. 

You may also remember the fact it could be bled at the push of a button. Well, it used to be a button, but now refinements to the design have seen BikeYoke replace it with a single 4mm ‘reset bolt’ that performs the same function.

Releasing any air from the hydraulic-lockout circuit is as simple as releasing the 4mm Allen key shown below, the post must then be pushed downwards through its travel. Then, simply release the Allen key and push the remote lever. 

Design refinements have seen the Revive's bleed valve go from a button to a bolt
To ‘reset’ (bleed) the Revive one must release a 4mm Allen key bolt and cycle the post downwards through its travel. Then, simply release the Allen key and push the remote lever
Oliver Woodman / Immediate Media

This version features a 160mm drop and is sold in 30.9mm or 31.6mm diameters and comes bundled with the firm’s own Triggy lever.

Bold claims mean our expectations are high for this one, we’ve handed it across to Tom from What Mountain Bike, a renowned dropper stopper and the perfect test pilot for this part. Ours weighs in at 524g without a lever.

  • From €310 (international delivery available)

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