What is the difference between an Italian and BSA bottom bracket?

We explain the esoteric standard used on Pinarello's new bikes

The difference between an Italian threaded and BSA threaded bottom bracket is incredibly subtle. Unsurprisingly, our Italian threaded tap doesn't see too much action

We recently posted several stories about some new bikes from Pinarello that, rather curiously, use Italian threaded bottom brackets. This prompted a few questions from readers, such as what is an Italian bottom bracket and what is the difference between a standard BSA (English, British, or I.S.O) bottom bracket and an Italian one?

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Italian threaded BBs are prone to suffering from a phenomenon called precession

The key difference is in how the two thread into the bottom bracket shell. Like pedals, one side of a BSA standard bottom bracket shell is reverse (left) threaded, while both sides of an Italian standard bottom bracket shell are regularly (right) threaded.

The size of the shell is also different, with BSA bottom brackets using a 1.375” (34.92mm) diameter shell and Italian BB’s using a 36mm diameter shell.

The width of the bottom bracket shell is also different; BSA bottom brackets are usually 68mm or 73mm wide, while Italian threaded bottom brackets come in at 70mm wide.

Both standards use a 24tpi pitch thread.

It’s very rare to encounter an Italian threaded bottom bracket these days as they’re prone to suffering from a phenomenon called precession. Precession occurs when the forces acting on the driveside of the bottom bracket — which is right-hand threaded — make it unscrew from the bottom bracket shell.

BSA bottom brackets are reverse threaded on the driveside to counteract this. Jobst Brandt wrote an excellent article on the subject for Sheldon Brown’s legendary site that can be found here.

We’ve contacted Pinarello to ask if it would like to pass comment on why it has decided to spec its new Dogma K10 and F10 with this slightly esoteric of standards and will update this article once we have a response.

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With all of that said, Italian standard bottom brackets are widely available. Shimano and Campagnolo offer their top-end kit in both English and Italian standards, so you’re by no means stuck if you have a bike with an Italian bottom bracket.