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Time Xpresso 2 pedals review

Very good power transfer, natural float and easy clipping in for not a lot of cash, a good beginner's pedal

Our rating 
5.0 out of 5 star rating 5.0
GBP £50.00 RRP | USD $65.00
Time Xpresso 2 pedals for road cycling

Our review

Easy engagement with natural float and lightweight due to the unique carbon blade design
Pros: Easy to use; large stable platform; smooth float; lightweight
Cons: Sharp edges
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Time’s Xpresso 2 pedals are an affordable option that brings the company’s unique composite blade technology to a lower price point.

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Their low weight and ease of use will appeal to a wide range of cyclists, especially those taking their first tentative steps into the world of clipless pedals.

While lower-grade materials are used to keep the price down, the pedals are based on the same fundamental technology that underpins the company’s top-end pedals.

The pedal body is constructed from a steel axle and a composite blade that serves as the retention spring. The cleats are compatible with all three-bolt cycling shoes and offer a range of lateral adjustment because they are left- and right-specific (but you can switch them around).

The pedals also feature a low stack height (the distance between the pedal axle and sole) and a large 700mm² interchangeable pedal platform.

There are several standout highlights of the Xpresso 2 pedals. The first is just how easy they are to clip in, although this often requires you to flip the pedal around because, frustratingly, they don’t always hang at the optimum angle.

That aside, the pedal’s iCLiC system means the pedal retention system is open and poised for the incoming cleat compared with a regular pedal where you’re pushing against the retention spring for a more definite click of engagement. The result is that an incredibly light push is all that’s required to clip in – a bonus for lighter cyclists and beginners.

Once clipped in, the large surface area results in impressive power transfer and the 15-degree release angle avoids the potential for accidental disengagement. There’s not a hint of roll or unwanted movement when pedalling hard out of the saddle whether climbing or sprinting, which is very reassuring in a wide range of situations. When intended, clipping out is a very positive experience.

The pedals have +/- 5 degrees of angular float that’s more natural and friction-free than other pedal systemsIt feels very fluid and the cleats naturally self-align, which helps with efficient pedalling and is intended to prevent knee pain.

During regular pedalling, my feet settled into a comfortable position in the float and while you have three levels of adjustment, I never felt the need to change it.

Walking is easy, despite the 3-bolt cleats being on the large side. They can wear out quickly, but replacements are fairly cheap. The pedal bearings can’t be serviced at home unfortunately, but the composite pedal body is robust.

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Watch out for the sharp angles on the pedals when wheeling your bike.

Other pedals on test

  • ETC Keo Style pedals: £48
  • HT Components Carbon PK01 pedals: £100 / US$150
  • Look Keo 2 Max Carbon pedals: £95 / US$125 / AU$187 / €100
  • Look Keo Classic 3 Plus pedals: £59 / US$75 / AU$102 / €60
  • Shimano 105 R7000 pedals: £120 / US$150 / AU$189
  • Shimano Tiagra R550 pedals: £75 / US$100 / AU$99
  • Shimano Ultegra R8000 pedals: £157 / UIS$200 / AU$249
  • Speedplay Zero Chromoly pedals: £150 / AU$297 / €170
  • Time XPro 10 pedals: £150 / US$175

Product Specifications

Product

Price GBP £50.00USD $65.00
Weight 315g – 226g pedals / 89g cleats
Brand Time

Features

Features Composite body with steel axle
Large pedal platform
Angular float (+/-5°) and lateral float (2.5 mm)
15° release angle
14.4mm stack height