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Tern Quick Haul P9 review

Compact cargo bike with a wealth of options

Our rating 
4.5 out of 5 star rating 4.5
GBP £3,100.00 RRP | USD $3,299.00 | AUD $4,995.00
Tern Quick Haul commuter eBike

Our review

Genuinely a viable car replacement: versatile, well made and a great ride
Pros: Epic versatility; comfortable; compact; fun
Cons: Add-ons can bump up the price
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Tern’s small-wheeled compact cargo bikes are ever popular thanks to versatility that means you can adapt them using a wide range of Tern accessories. The brand’s electric bikes can carry huge loads (up to 70kg on the Quick Haul range), children and dogs.

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The downside in the past, however, has been that the highly rated HSD and GSD bikes came at prices from £3,600 up to a huge £8,400, and that’s before you added the accessories you’ll need to build your perfect cargo companion.

The new Quick Haul range has a more compact design and a much lower price, starting at £2,800 for the D8 model.

Tern Quick Haul P9 specifications and details

The Quick Haul is a new, more affordable e-cargo by from Tern.
Russell Burton / Our Media

At the heart of the P9 is a very clever compact frame with a low-slung design that makes it easy to use for a wider range of riders.

I’m 6ft 2in and fitted the bike well, as did my partner who, at 5ft, is very much at the other end of the scale.

The Speedlifter stem allows for 150mm of speedy handlebar height adjustment.
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Along with a quick-release seatpost, there’s a clever Speedlifter stem, so you can adjust bar height by up to 150mm in an instant, enabling you to swap between riders easily.

The frame’s core holds a Bosch Performance motor mid-mounted and low down, with the Bosch external 400Wh battery also sitting low within the extended rear of the bike.

Bish, bash Bosch: there’s a useful 65Nm of torque from the Bosch motor.
Russell Burton / Our Media

The extensive rear rack system has a very clever trick up its sleeve.

It’s designed to enable the bike to stand safely on its end. This frees up space when storing it, and you can use the Speedlifter stem to turn the bars independently of the front wheel too, which reduces the width of the stored bike.

Tern offers a wide variety of storage accessories.
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The Quick Haul is well named because it’s quite a peppy electric hybrid bike to ride. The Bosch motor has plenty of torque (65Nm claimed) and the Eco, Tour, Sport and Turbo modes have distinctive differences between them.

The bike has plenty of range: in my testing I got an average 46 miles/75km per charge with 1,969ft/600m of elevation included in that distance. It’s impressive stuff for a bike with 20-inch wheels designed to carry cargo.

Mudguards and a kickstand keep things practical, as you’d expect.
Russell Burton / Our Media

Tern Quick Haul P9 ride impressions

I’ve been seriously impressed by the Tern Quick Haul.
Russell Burton / Our Media

The P9’s handling is brilliant. The steering is light and for quite a long bike it feels very agile, slotting through bike-path gates and between street furniture in the city with great balance and fine, swift responses.

However, be aware of your extra width if you’re using the wide Transporteur front rack and the rear Soft Crate, as I was throughout testing.

The front rack adds width, so take care when riding.
Russell Burton / Our Media

The ride quality is superb too. The high-volume Schwalbe tyres squash lumps, bumps and ruts with ease, to the point where I never considered I’d need the suspension fork you’ll find on the more expensive HSD model.

The contact points further add to the comfort, with the supple Velo saddle negating the need for padded cycling shorts and the ergo-shaped grips taking care of your hands.

The plush Schwalbe Big Apple tyres mean there’s no need for suspension.
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The Shimano gears and brakes go about their business in a fuss-free manner and the 9-speed drivetrain means easy going on the climbs, especially when backed up with Bosch power.

The gearing also means you can roll along at quite a lick and take full advantage on the descents.

Good braking adds to a fine all-round package.
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The brilliance of these Tern bikes, however, is the ecosystem of accessories you can make use of. There’s a huge range of options on racks, packs, crates, bags and panniers to help you get the exact bike for your needs.

If you want safe seating on the back for your child, no problem, and you can even add a storm-proof cover to keep them dry.

You can carry the battery in Tern’s dedicated Glovebox.
Russell Burton / Our Media

Need a hardy crate to move goods or hefty equipment around town? You’re covered here too.

I wanted a large rack on the front and a box on the rear for commuting to the office with test gear and kit in tow during the week. Yet for the weekend I wanted a safe box for riding with my dog.

The Dog Roof Mini (one of Tern’s many optional extras) provides space for your canine companion.
Russell Burton / Our Media

Tern even had me covered with a combination of the rack-extending Clubhouse Mini, Soft Crate Mini and Dog Roof Mini (which comes complete with pet safety harnesses). I also added Tern’s frame-mounted Glovebox to store a couple of bike locks safely.

That does all mount up: my six extras added £575 to the total price. However, at £3,575, it’s still cheaper than Tern’s premium bikes.

The Bosch display shows speed, battery life and motor mode.
Russell Burton / Our Media

Tern Quick Haul P9 bottom line

Through my extensive testing of the Quick Haul, it’s been a superb commuting bike. It’s carried the weekly grocery shopping with ease, transported my dog out to the countryside and even brought home bags of compost, bedding plants and enough supplies from a garden centre to keep Monty Don busy for a few weekends.

Like its pricier siblings, the Quick Haul provides a genuine replacement for a car. It can carry huge loads, has more than enough range for the longest commutes (and the compact Bosch charger fits in the glove box too).

It’s practical beyond all else, but at its heart is still a bike and therefore fun to ride.

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I’m more than smitten with the Tern and I’m seriously considering buying a Quick Haul because it has become something of an essential since it’s been on my testing schedule.

Product Specifications

Product

Price AUD $4995.00GBP £3100.00USD $3299.00
Weight 23kg (One size)
Brand Tern

Features

Features Chainguard: SKS Chainblade
Pedals: Urban non-slip
Front light: Herrmans 120 lumen
Rear light: Herrmans
Mudguards: Cromeplastic
Rack: Atlas Q rack

Additional extras:
Transporteur front rack (£155), QR mount (£25), Clubhouse Mini (£155), Dog Roof Mini (£80), Soft Crate Mini (£90), Glovebox (£60)
Handlebar Tern low riser
Tyres Schwalbe Big Apple Performance line 55-406 reflex
Stem Speedlifter 150mm extension
Shifter Shimano Alivio, 1 x 9 spd, trigger
Seatpost Alloy seatpost
Saddle Velo Comfort saddle
Rear derailleur Shimano Alivio Shadow
Motor Bosch Performance CX, Bosch Purion display, Bosch PowerPack 400
Grips/Tape Velo Ergo lock-on
Available sizes One size
Frame Aluminium
Fork Steel (150kg rated)
Cranks Tern custom, forged 6061-AL crankarm
Chain KMC for eBike, 9 spd
Cassette Shimano 11-34T, 9 spd
Brakes Shimano Hydraulic disc
Bottom bracket Motor integrated
Wheels 20” Kinetic comp rims on Shimano hubs