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BMC Roadmachine AMP One first ride review

Swiss brand's new electric bike is built for endurance

GBP £7,600.00 RRP | USD $8,499.00 | EUR €7,999.00
BMC Roadmachine AMP eBike

Our review

Superb handling and smoothly integrated assistance make the new AMP a worthy addition to the Roadmachine range
Pros: Brilliant, natural ride; balanced feel; impressive range; quality contact points
Cons: Tyres could be better
Skip to view product specifications

BMC’s new electric road bike, the Roadmachine AMP, is a motorised endurance bike that feels very familiar due to its similarities to the non-assisted BMC Roadmachine X One I reviewed for our 2022 Bike of the Year test.

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The new electric bike is modelled on the long-standing – and very popular – Roadmachine endurance bike, and, in many respects, that is reflected in the ride.

Head to my news story on the BMC Roadmachine AMP launch for all the tech details. Here, I’m going to focus on my first impressions from a ride on the mountainous roads of the Tour de Suisse stage three.

BMC Roadmachine AMP geometry

The sharp, angular frame shapes mirror the non-assisted Roadmachine’s design.
Warren Rossiter / Our Media

The bike’s handling is superbly balanced, with its slightly relaxed head angle of 71 degrees bringing a stability to the steering, especially with the 63mm trail on the fork.

The trail figure is derived from a combination of the head tube angle and the fork offset. A small measure of trail makes for a fast-handling bike; more trail slows down the steering response. The new bike’s 63mm is very much at the relaxed end of things, even for an endurance bike. It’s a figure I’d usually expect to find on a gravel bike.

However, it’s paired with a steep 74.2-degree seat angle, which puts you square over the cranks, helping to get your power driving you forward with efficiency.

This all adds up to a bike that’s great to climb on and carves through steep, twisting road descents with consummate ease.

Size475154565861
Stack (mm)516541562586610644
Reach (mm)374382386390394398
Seat tube (mm)420457500522539573
Top tube (mm)522532546556568583
Head tube (mm)112139156181206242
Seat angle (degrees)74.274.274.274.274.274.2
Head tube angle (degrees)71.271.272727272
Rear centre (mm)410410410410410410
Front centre (mm)583599597609621635
Wheelbase (mm)9829999971,0081,0201,035
BB drop (mm)717171717171
Fork length (mm)375375375375375375
Fork rake (mm)505045454545
Trail (mm)636363636363
Standover height (mm)719750782805825859
Crank length (mm)170170172.5175175175
Stem length (mm)9090100110110120
Stem angle (degrees) (ICS01 Stem)-12.5-12.5-12.5-12.5-12.5-12.5
Bar width (mm)400420420420420420
Bar drop (mm)125125125125125125
Bar Reach (mm)707070707070
Seatpost length (mm)330380380380380380
Seatpost offset (mm)151515151515

BMC Roadmachine AMP ride impressions

Dropped seatstays are a BMC signature, influential on so many current road bikes.
Warren Rossiter / Our Media

I tested the new Roadmachine AMP, featuring Mahle’s new lighter, more compact X20 motor system, riding the toughest parts of this year’s Tour de Suisse third stage.

The stage included a trio of climbs that helped get to the heart of the Roadmachine’s ride feel and performance.

BMC’s take on the road e-bike is all about big days out.
BMC

I was surprised by how much the AMP felt like a non-assisted bike. On paper, the weight of more than 11kg seems heavy, but it doesn’t feel it on the road and, with the weight of the ebike components sitting low down, the AMP is supremely balanced.

Mahle has certainly improved the motor control over the older X35 hub, and despite its more compact dimensions, the X20 feels somewhat punchier in every setting.

The way in which the power feeds in better matches your inputs, thanks to the clever combination of cadence and power measurement from the new bottom bracket.

The new bottom bracket has a positive effect, combining cadence and power measurement.
Warren Rossiter / Our Media

The inclusion of Bluetooth in the Mahle system meant I could connect it to my Garmin Edge 1030 head unit easily, using the touchscreen to control the motor and select power modes.

It’s certainly preferable to the simple top-tube mounted control, where you need to scroll through the modes.

What’s really impressive is just how smoothly the system is integrated into the Roadmachine silhouette.

The Endurance geometry makes the Roadmachine AMP a super-stable handling bike.
BMC

The diameter of the down tube is barely discernibly bigger than the non-assisted bike. The controller integrated into the top tube is a new, more subtle design than the previous iWoc button.

Where things have improved massively is with the motor itself. The dimensions are markedly smaller, meaning it was almost hidden behind the 160mm disc rotor and 10-36 cassette of my Force-AXS equipped bike.

The top-tube controller shows both the mode you are in and remaining battery level with its strip LED.
Warren Rossiter / Our Media

Range-wise, the AMP certainly impressed. After 58.26miles / 93.76km with 6,657ft / 2,029m of elevation, the bike had just over 40 per cent left in its 350Wh battery.

That’s an impressive distance and I’m keen to find out just how much further the Roadmachine AMP’s range can be pushed when I eventually get a bike for a full test.

The BMC Roadmachine AMP One climbs like a regular bike.
BMC

The AMP comes with a slick build, and the SRAM Force AXS groupset performed its shifting and braking duties with precision.

The braking is excellent and full of feel – perfect for keeping momentum on long descents and scrubbing just enough speed to hit the perfect line on every corner.

The new top-tube mounted controller is simple to use.
Warren Rossiter / Our Media

The contact points are excellent too, and I like the BMC handlebar’s shape. The combination of the high-quality carbon seatpost, Fizik saddle and the Roadmachine’s smooth-riding frame and fork is endurance-bike gold.

The Vittoria tyres roll well enough and grip superbly through fast corners. However, the Rubino Pro isn’t the Italian tyre brand’s top offering and on a bike that retails at £7,600 I would expect nothing less than a top-line pair of the best road bike tyres.

BMC Roadmachine AMP bottom line

I’m hugely impressed with the Roadmachine AMP. It isn’t that much heavier than the headline-grabbing lightweight electric road offerings over the last couple of years, but it has a significantly larger battery, which should make for a far greater range.

The ride is very good and the bike feels so natural that you’ll only ever need the assistance when the going gets steep and long.

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Plus, once you’ve crested a climb, the AMP has the handling chops and ride quality to make it the highlight of your ride.

Product Specifications

Product

Price EUR €7999.00GBP £7600.00USD $8499.00
Brand Bmc

Features

Brakes SRAM Force eTap AXS HRD Centerline X Rotors (160/160)
Cassette SRAM Force XG-1270 10-36T
Chain SRAM Force 12 Speed
Cranks SRAM Force AXS 46-33T
Fork Roadmachine AMP Premium Carbon with Tuned Compliance Concept Endurance
Frame Roadmachine AMP Premium Carbon with Tuned Compliance Concept Endurance
Front derailleur SRAM Force eTap AXS
Handlebar BMC RAB 02, Ergo Top Shape, Compact Bend
Motor Drive unit, charger, contol: Mahle X20 / Battery pack: iX350 - 350 Wh
Rear derailleur SRAM Force eTap AXS
Saddle Fizik Taiga
Seatpost Roadmachine AMP Premium Carbon D-Shaped Seatpost
Shifter SRAM Force eTap AXS
Stem BMC ICS01
Tyres Vittoria Rubino Pro, 28 mm
Wheels CRD-321 Carbon, Tubeless Ready