Best track pumps 2020

Our favourite track pumps for inflating road and mountain bike tyres

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If you’ve ever tried to use a hand pump to get your tyres up to any kind of reasonable pressure you’ll know how difficult it can be.

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Compared to most hand pumps, a track pump – or floor pump as they’re sometimes known – will be quicker, more comfortable and more accurate in use.

They’re ideal for the workshop of the home mechanic or for making quick adjustments in the trail centre car park.

This list includes a selection of track pumps for road and mountain use, with those included being spread across a wide range of budgets.

The best track pumps, as rated by our expert testers

  • Lezyne Classic Over Drive: £60 / $70 / AU$200
  • Lifeline Professional: £40 / $49 / AU$83
  • Birzman Maha Push & Twist V: £45 / $48 / AU$80
  • Topeak Joeblow Mountain X: £55 / $70 / AU$100
  • Lezyne CNC Digital Drive: £110 / $130 / AU$180
  • Scott Syncros Vernon 2.0HV: £55 / $60
  • SKS Air-X-Press 8.0: £30
  • SKS Rennkompressor: £70 / $80 / AU$113

Lezyne Classic Over Drive

4.5 out of 5 star rating
Best track pumps
Although the gauge is at the base, it’s easy to read and accurate.
Andy Lloyd
  • Use: MTB
  • Price: £60 / $70 / AU$200

The long, mid-volume barrel and quality metal construction help this Lezyne pump strike a great performance balance, with an easy action, smooth feel and low stroke counts. Although the gauge is at the base, it’s easy to read and accurate. The hose is long, and it’s easy to swap between valve types.

It’s a shame that there’s no bleed valve for spot-on pressure adjustment and some won’t like the screw-on head, although we had no issues with the valve core working loose. Max pressure is only 60psi, which counts out use as a road pump.

LifeLine Professional

4.5 out of 5 star rating
Best track pumps
LifeLine’s Professional track pump is efficient, accurate and affordable.
David Caudery/Immediate Media
  • Use: Road, MTB
  • Price: £40 / $49 / AU$83

Lifeline’s professional track pump gets a 25mm Continental GP4000 tyre to 100psi in 25 strokes and was just 2psi out on our separate pressure gauge, which is nowt unless you’re an Olympian… or very particular.

The steel barrel, wooden handle, long hose and all-metal switchable chuck are very impressive for the price, and we’ve had one of these going strong for years without complaint.

Birzman Maha Push & Twist V

4.0 out of 5 star rating
Best track pumps
The Birzman Maha Push & Twist V is a decent track pump for road and mountain bikes.
David Caudery/Immediate Media
  • Use: Road, MTB
  • Price: £45 / $48 / AU$80

The Birzman’s USP is its ‘Push and Twist’ head – simply push down and twist and it is both secure and quick and easy to disconnect. It took around 30 strokes to hit 100psi, or a few psi higher according to our gauge.

The chunky polymer feet and handle lack the LifeLine’s looks and feel, but the Twist/Push head is neat and effective.

Topeak Joeblow Mountain X

4.0 out of 5 star rating
Best track pumps
A rubberised handle and smooth action add to the comfy, solid feel.
Andy Lloyd
  • Use: MTB
  • Price: £55 / $70 / AU$100

With its high-volume metal barrel, the mountain bike-specific Joeblow gets tons of air into tyres with just a few strokes and seats tubeless mountain bike tyres easily.

The head has a large locking lever, with separate holes for each valve type. There’s a big bleed valve near the base for fine-tuning pressure, via the large, easy-to-read gauge located midway up the barrel. A rubberised handle and smooth action add to the comfy, solid feel.

It’s not quite as stable as we’d like though and the hose isn’t that long, so using it on bikes mounted in a workstand is tricky. The high volume also means a stiffer action, and it only inflates to a max of 60psi.

Lezyne CNC Digital Drive

3.5 out of 5 star rating
Best track pumps
The Lezyne CNC Digital Drive’s party trick is its digital gauge.
David Caudery/Immediate Media
  • Use: Road, MTB
  • Price: £110 / $130 / AU$180

We found the CNC Digital Drive to have a very consistent gauge reading. Its long braided hose is attached to a screw-on ABS-1 HP head which – while slower than a thumb-lock – proved very secure on the valve.

We’re not sure you’ll ever hit the 350psi max, especially because it took a slightly sluggish 35 to 36 strokes to hit 100psi, but it’s well made and all the parts are replaceable.

Scott Syncros Vernon 2.0HV

3.5 out of 5 star rating
Best track pumps
A long hose leads to an easily swappable and secure head.
Andy Lloyd
  • Use: MTB
  • Price: £55 / $60

HV refers to the high-volume build of this MTB-specific pump, which takes joint honours for the fewest strokes to get our test mountain bike tyres up to pressure.

It’s solidly constructed and, despite not having the widest base, remains stable during pumping. A long hose leads to an easily swappable and secure head. The gauge is mounted at the top of the barrel and has a clear PSI and bar scale. Next to this is an easy-to-access bleed valve.

The action is fairly stiff though, which makes seating tubeless tyres hard work despite the ample air volume, not helped by the basic plastic handle. A max pressure of 40psi limits its versatility.

SKS Air-X-Press 8.0

3.5 out of 5 star rating
Best track pumps
In use, the plastic handle is comfortable to hold.
Andy Lloyd
  • Use: Road, MTB
  • Price: £30

This pump is good value and, in years of use, has proven very robust, even if it doesn’t feel particularly sturdy. The two-hole head works well, while the gauge goes up to 140psi, proved accurate and is easy to read from a distance. In use, the plastic handle is comfortable to hold.

It’s rather wobbly though and the hose is short compared to other pumps. The barrel is also short, so you end up stooping to pump. While we managed to seat a tubeless tyre with the Air-X-Press, it took some furious pumping and more strokes than others. The action isn’t the smoothest either.

SKS Rennkompressor

3.5 out of 5 star rating
Track Pump road bike
The SKS Rennkompressor is built to last.
David Caudery/Immediate Media
  • Use: Road, MTB
  • Price: £70 / $80 / AU$113

The superbly constructed Rennkompressor came with a thumb-lock head (one of three chucks available) and took upwards of 35 strokes to reach our target pressure of 100psi, due to the shortish barrel.

But the sprung action is lovely and smooth and the fold-up metal feet make it handy for the car. The low-level gauge is the smallest and hardest to read here though.

Also consider

The following pumps didn’t score highly enough to be considered best buys, but they did score highly enough to remain in this list for your consideration.

Blackburn Piston 2

3.0 out of 5 star rating
Best track pumps
The Piston 2 from Blackburn is a safe bet but watch for the relatively short hose.
David Caudery/Immediate Media
  • Use: Road, MTB
  • Price: £40 / $40 / AU$70

It took us a reasonable 30 strokes to hit our 100psi pressure point and the accuracy is very good, but it did take more hard work than some of the others on test, and the 90cm hose is shorter than most here too.

The metal feet keep it stable, the large black-on-yellow gauge with yellow pointer is very easy to read, but the chuck is an all-plastic affair and lacks a bleed valve.

Park Tool Home Mechanic PFP-8

3.0 out of 5 star rating
Best track pumps
The PFP-8 gauge is large and fairly easy to read, and goes up to 160psi.
Andy Lloyd
  • Use: Road, MTB
  • Price: £30 / $36 / AU$80

The PFP-8’s low-volume barrel delivers a light action, but it took double the strokes of the Joeblow Mountain X to get tyres up to full pressure.

While the handle is narrow, its curved shape makes it comfy to use. The gauge is large and fairly easy to read, and goes up to 160psi. It’s the joint-cheapest pump here.

The head is basic though with no bleed valve and our gauge wasn’t that accurate. You must weight both footplates to keep it stable, and the short-ish length means you have to bend over to pump. Also, air escapes during the first few strokes (from 0psi).

Silca Pista Plus

3.0 out of 5 star rating
Best track pumps
Silca’s Pista Plus is a little pricy.
David Caudery/Immediate Media
  • Use: Road, MTB
  • Price: £145 / $145 / AU$260

There’s a reassuring air of quality about the Silca, with its machined ash wood handle and chunky push-on chuck complete with real leather piston (both replaceable, natch). But the slightly shorter barrel results in 35 strokes to hit 100psi, though the accuracy was good.

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A lovely last-a-lifetime pump but the Silca’s price is, er, inflated…