6 of the best track pumps

A home workshop (and trail centre car park) essential

If you’ve ever tried to use a hand pump to get your tyres up to any kind of reasonable pressure you’ll know how difficult it is. So it could be time for you to invest in a track pump and here are six we’ve tested and ranked for you.

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Topeak Joe Blow Mountain

4.5 out of 5 star rating
Topeak Joe Blow Mountain
Topeak Joe Blow Mountain
Jacob Gibbins
  • Price: £42 / $50 / AU$80

So good… The Joe Blow Mountain is the only MTB-specific model here and with every pump of the comfortable handle it shifts a large volume of air.

This means it seats tubeless tyres quickly and took less than half the number of pumps — 15 — to get our tyre to 30psi compared to some of the others here.

It has a very accurate dial, as well as a bleed valve for fine-tuning your pressures.

No good… Due to the amount of air it shifts, it takes quite a bit of muscle to get it going. It only goes to 70psi, so you won’t be able to use it on your road bike too.

SKS Airworx Plus 10.0

4.0 out of 5 star rating
SKS Airworx Plus 10.0
SKS Airworx Plus 10.0
Jacob Gibbins
  • Price: £70 / $60

So good… You’re immediately aware of the German engineering quality when you use the Airworx Plus and it feels like it’ll last a lifetime.

It was the second fastest pump on test, only taking 28 strokes to get our tyre up to 30psi, and has a very smooth action. The dial is accurate and easy to read, and the pump head has holes for both Presta and Schrader valves.

No good… The storage slots for the hose aren’t very secure so it would pop out and get tangled up every time we moved the pump. It’s also the most expensive unit on test.

Park PFP-8

4.0 out of 5 star rating
Park PFP-8
Park PFP-8
Jacob Gibbins
  • Price: £35 / $38 / AU$80

So good… This is the cheapest pump here, but it performs as well as all but the Topeak and SKS, feeling smooth in its action and generally well made.

The head has two valve holes, and the locking lever has a solid action and creates a good seal without being fiddly. It took us 32 pumps to reach 30psi, putting the PFP-8 in the middle of the pack in terms of speed.

No good… The pressure gauge on the Park Tool pump consistently read lower than the other pumps on test and the digital gauge that we were using as our point of reference.

TruFlo Airess

4.0 out of 5 star rating
TruFlo Airess
TruFlo Airess
Jacob Gibbins
  • Price: £65

So good… TruFlo’s Airess is a high-quality product, with a beautifully finished wooden handle, a metal barrel and a smooth pumping action.

It reached our desired 30psi pressure in 31 strokes. The wide die-cast metal footplate makes it the most stable on test and you can really pump it hard to get tricky tubeless tyres seated on the rim.

No good… There’s only one valve hole on the pump head, so if you need to switch between Presta and Schrader valves you have to take it apart and rotate the rubber barrel inside, which is a bit fiddly.

Pedro’s Prestige

3.5 out of 5 star rating
Pedro’s Prestige
Pedro’s Prestige
Jacob Gibbins
  • Price: £49 / $48

So good… The best feature on the Prestige is the T-shaped pump head, which has a Presta valve hole on one side and a Schrader on the other, plus a solid-feeling locking lever that’s easy to use.

With markings every 2psi, the pressure gauge is the most detailed of all the pumps here.

No good… Pedro’s offering just didn’t feel as solid as the other pumps on test and had a bit of a rattly action. It was also the joint slowest inflator, taking 38 strokes to get a 27.5×2.35in Maxxis High Roller II tyre to 30psi.

Blackburn Piston 3

3.5 out of 5 star rating
Blackburn Piston 3
Blackburn Piston 3
Jacob Gibbins
  • Price: £53 / $50 / AU$90

So good… With a steel barrel and base, the Piston 3 has a solid feel. Its pumping action remained smooth throughout our test period too.

The large gauge and bleed valve make it easy to get your pressures right first time, and the locking lever for the valve is nice and big, and easy to use.

No good… The pump head only has one valve hole and it takes a while to swap it between its Presta and Schrader modes. Taking 38 strokes to get our tyre to 30psi, the Blackburn pump was the joint slowest on test.

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